Melody's Musings

Stuff that catches my fancy and random, sorted thoughts from the inner scrambles of my mind.

What you may expect to find here are what I consider good taste and some of the best in photography, philosophy, humor, art, architecture, food, music, poetry, literature and dance. I hope you like some of the things I enjoy.

I like anything to do with good design such as interior design, architecture, photography, and art. I enjoy philosophy and psychology. I love to figure out what makes individuals tick. Music of most all types but particularly classical, world, pop, acoustic guitar is a big part of my life and add some dance to the music and my day is great! I like to write and occasionally I will write poetry and I really love to read it out loud and I even record it sometimes.

I'm a Myers-Briggs type ENFJ which means I love people and have a great interest in them.

I guess you could say I'm a humanities kind of person. :)







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    Stunning Works Of Art You Wont Believe Aren’t Photographs

    These incredible works of art will have you questioning your eyes.

    See more here:  http://www.buzzfeed.com/hnigatu/works-of-art-you-wont-believe-arent-photographs

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    Winter can be a beautiful thing

    HQ-Winter-26

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    Capturing the Moon

    Capturing the Moon

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    Fall’s in the air!

    (Source: 4inspireddesign.com)

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    Autumn Colors

    (Source: 4inspireddesign.com)

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    Rolls-Royce 10EX Concept Car, 1925

    Rolls-Royce 10EX Concept Car, 1925

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    Grand Central Station, 1937 Horse Cart Street Cleaners Horse Carts Under Brooklyn Bridge, May 6, 1918 Times Square, January 1938 Robbery Attempt Gone Wrong, 1915 Brooklyn Bridge Painters, Salignac Traffic In Manhattan, January 29, 1923 Paving 28th Street, October 2, 1930

    An archive so great, it crashed as soon as it opened

    Last month, New York City’s Department of Records announced that it had digitized and uploaded 870,000 of the best photographs out of the 2,200,000 kept in the city’s Municipal Archives. The pictures date from the mid-1800s onward and document every aspect of city governance, from bridges to iconic buildings to mug shots to crime scenes to road work that captures vibrant immigrant neighborhoods as they were before gentrification flattened their characters. A few of them have been published before, but most of them are revelations.

    The Department of Records has been working for four years to make this vast store of hidden gems available to the public as part of an initiative to make city records generally accessible. Until now, if you wanted to see any of these pictures, you had to go to the archive building and go through the microfilm and print records. Although the entire archive hasn’t been uploaded at this point because it’s on a tight technological and funding budget, the department will continue to add new content to the online database.

    Those technological limitations became immediately obvious when the day after the database opened, it crashed. The interest was massive and came from all over the world, which meant that the poor server never caught a break.

    “There is so much world-wide interest,” said Eileen Flannelly, deputy commissioner for the city’s Department of Records. “We knew it would be huge in the city and for New Yorkers, but the actual interest coming in from Germany and Spain and Brazil and the Czech Republic, all of these places, they can’t get enough of it. Like 12,000 hits every few minutes in the middle of the night.”

    It was down for weeks before they finally got their act together. Now the site is stable and therefore finally bloggable.

    Most of the pictures were taken by anonymous municipal workers in the course of their duties, although there are some standout pieces by professionals like Eugene de Salignac, the Boston-born descendant of French nobility who at the age of 42 became the official photographer for the Department of Bridges/Plant and Structures in 1906. The department’s only photographer, over the next three decades he took 20,000 pictures of Manhattan’s most famous landmarks as they went up. He retired in 1934 and died in 1943, a virtual unknown, until in 1999 Municipal Archives photographer Michael Lorenzini recognized that a number of outstanding photographs had to be the work of one man. Lorenzini dug through the archives and historical records and finally put a name to the prodigious talent, bringing de Salignac out of obscurity into museum exhibits and coffee table books.

    The database also includes a grimly fascinating collection of glass-plate photographs taken by the New York City Police Department. It’s the largest collection of criminal justice evidence in the English-speaking world, and it’s amazing how many of these grisly murder scenes are so artful they could easily be stills from a film noir.

    Less bloody but just as fascinating are the 1,279 images collected by the Works Progress Administration’s Federal Writers’ Project, a New Deal program that between 1935 and 1943 collected pictures from Art Project photographers and others for inclusion in publications like the WPA Guide to New York City. When the program ended, the Municipal Archives acquired the collection.

    You can search the database by keyword or department, or you can browse by categories. I prefer the categories because I like going through the pictures from oldest to newest.

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    A Wet Day Fire in Oxford Street

    Oxford Street, London, 1897

    (Source: retronaut.co)

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    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada
Although we don’t often visit our friends up north, Canada is home to some stunning contemporary dwellings. One of our personal favorites is this beautiful Hillcrest House residing in Victoria, BC, Canada.
The contemporary Hillcrest Residence was designed by Victoria Design Group, and built by Canadian house builder Michael Knight, and features an exterior that is covered in wood paneling. Lights running along the roof overhang provide nice touches for the floor to ceiling windows covering the entire property. The multi -level dwelling is surrounded by lush green landscape, and features breathtaking water views from the backyard.

    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada

    Although we don’t often visit our friends up north, Canada is home to some stunning contemporary dwellings. One of our personal favorites is this beautiful Hillcrest House residing in Victoria, BC, Canada.

    The contemporary Hillcrest Residence was designed by Victoria Design Group, and built by Canadian house builder Michael Knight, and features an exterior that is covered in wood paneling. Lights running along the roof overhang provide nice touches for the floor to ceiling windows covering the entire property. The multi -level dwelling is surrounded by lush green landscape, and features breathtaking water views from the backyard.

    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada (13)

    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada (12)

    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada (11)

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    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada (2)

    Contemporary Hillcrest Residence in Canada (1)

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    Off-the-Charts Hottest Places On Earth

    Hottest: El Azizia, Libya

    Highest temperature recorded: 136 degrees Fahrenheit

    Hottest: Death Valley, United States 

    Highest temperature recorded: 134 degrees Fahrenheit

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    Home Architecture An Architect’s Long-Due Dream Beach House

    An Architect’s Long-Due Dream Beach House

    Designed for and by architect and owner Lewis W. Butler of Butler Armsden Architects, this project was completed by the conception of warm tones beautifying the interiors, work done by Scavullo Design. The heart-warming design showcased by this Californian beach villa was inspired by the beautiful weather and strives to create a strong connection to the surroundings. Spotted on Desire To Inspire, the Stinson Beach House displays a casual collection of building materials like red cedar shingles, bluestone paving the courtyard or Alaskan yellow cedar adorning the ocean side terrace.

    This is the story behind the inviting set of private and public spaces: “In 1950 a family bought a lot on the ocean at Stinson Beach in Northern California, but it wasn’t until 1982 that they began to plan a house for three generations. Besides the natural challenges of the coastal environment, there was the additional requirement of having the house carry forward the spirit of a William Wurster designed house built for the same family in Santa Cruz in 1935. The William Wurster house was well known as his only real courtyard house, and also for the large outdoor living room that was very unusual for its time. The plan evolved into an H shape, with a living room at the center, and the wings creating outdoor spaces facing both the Pacific Ocean, and the coastal range, in either direction. Rather than having an outdoor living room, the traditional living room has large sets of sliding doors that open to a position that matches the adjoining windows exactly, creating a distinctly outdoor experience. Depending on the weather, the doors can be open to the ocean, mountains, or both which provides great flexibility for enjoying the outdoors, indoors.

    http://cdn.freshome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Californian-Beach-Villa-by-Scavello-Design-10.jpg

    http://cdn.freshome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Californian-Beach-Villa-by-Scavello-Design-12.jpg

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    Tangerine Tango - Pantone Color of the Year for 2012

    How is the Pantone color selected?

    The color of the year selection is a very thoughtful process. To arrive at the selection, Pantone quite literally combs the world looking for color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films that are in production, traveling art collections, hot new artists, popular travel destinations and other socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from technology, availability of new textures and effects that impact color, and even upcoming sports events that capture worldwide attention.

    For more than a decade, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home and industrial design, as well as product packaging and graphic design. Past colors include:

    • PANTONE 18-2120 Honeysuckle (2011)
    • PANTONE 15-5519 Turquoise (2010)
    • PANTONE 14-0848 Mimosa (2009)
    • PANTONE 18-3943 Blue Iris (2008)
    • PANTONE 19-1557 Chili Pepper (2007)
    • PANTONE 13-1106 Sand Dollar (2006)
    • PANTONE 15-5217 Blue Turquoise (2005)
    • PANTONE 17-1456 Tigerlily (2004)
    • PANTONE 14-4811 Aqua Sky (2003)
    • PANTONE 19-1664 True Red (2002)
    • PANTONE 17-2031 Fuchsia Rose (2001)
    • PANTONE 15-4020 Cerulean (2000)

    (Source: sasinteriors.net)

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