Melody's Musings

Stuff that catches my fancy and random, sorted thoughts from the inner scrambles of my mind.

What you may expect to find here are what I consider good taste and some of the best in photography, philosophy, humor, art, architecture, food, music, poetry, literature and dance. I hope you like some of the things I enjoy.

I like anything to do with good design such as interior design, architecture, photography, and art. I enjoy philosophy and psychology. I love to figure out what makes individuals tick. Music of most all types but particularly classical, world, pop, acoustic guitar is a big part of my life and add some dance to the music and my day is great! I like to write and occasionally I will write poetry and I really love to read it out loud and I even record it sometimes.

I'm a Myers-Briggs type ENFJ which means I love people and have a great interest in them.

I guess you could say I'm a humanities kind of person. :)







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     Modern & Fun
Give old closet doors a new purpose as a headboard. Two closet doors mounted on the wall behind the bed create a sleek focal point in this midcentury-modern bedroom. Plus, the tall headboard gives the room a sense of height.

    Modern & Fun

    Give old closet doors a new purpose as a headboard. Two closet doors mounted on the wall behind the bed create a sleek focal point in this midcentury-modern bedroom. Plus, the tall headboard gives the room a sense of height.

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     Vintage-Look Headboard
Add a vintage country look to your bedroom with a feed-sack-covered headboard. A large feed sack provides enough fabric to cover a twin-size headboard. Staple two layers of batting over the front side of a piece of plywood, and then staple the feed sack on top of the batting. Pull the fabric taut as you add staples to the center of each side and then as you work your way to the corners. For a stunning finish, nail a piece of architectural salvage to the top of the upholstered headboard.
Upholstered Headboard How-To

    Vintage-Look Headboard

    Add a vintage country look to your bedroom with a feed-sack-covered headboard. A large feed sack provides enough fabric to cover a twin-size headboard. Staple two layers of batting over the front side of a piece of plywood, and then staple the feed sack on top of the batting. Pull the fabric taut as you add staples to the center of each side and then as you work your way to the corners. For a stunning finish, nail a piece of architectural salvage to the top of the upholstered headboard.

    Reblog
     Headboard Silhouette
Trace a curvaceous pattern on a piece of medium-density fiberboard, and cut out. Paint the edge white and cover the front with wallpaper. The pattern will look striking against a blank wall, doubling as artwork in a bedroom.: If using multiple pieces of wallpaper, take care to match the pattern for a chic, finished look.

    Headboard Silhouette

    Trace a curvaceous pattern on a piece of medium-density fiberboard, and cut out. Paint the edge white and cover the front with wallpaper. The pattern will look striking against a blank wall, doubling as artwork in a bedroom.: If using multiple pieces of wallpaper, take care to match the pattern for a chic, finished look.

    Reblog
     Home Center Headboard
For less than $100, you can make a headboard out of basics from your local home center. On a piece of medium-density fiberboard (MDF), draw a design that’s as wide as the mattress and about 40 inches tall; cut out. Use wood glue to cover the MDF with a piece of beaded board cut into the same shape. Glue strips of veneer over the rough edges. Glue or screw trim to the top edge and a finial in the cutout. Paint the entire piece. When dry, mount the headboard to the wall with 1 1/2-inch spacers.

    Home Center Headboard

    For less than $100, you can make a headboard out of basics from your local home center. On a piece of medium-density fiberboard (MDF), draw a design that’s as wide as the mattress and about 40 inches tall; cut out. Use wood glue to cover the MDF with a piece of beaded board cut into the same shape. Glue strips of veneer over the rough edges. Glue or screw trim to the top edge and a finial in the cutout. Paint the entire piece. When dry, mount the headboard to the wall with 1 1/2-inch spacers.

    Reblog
     Squared Off
Break an oversize headboard into small squares for an easy upholstered headboard project. To make this headboard, cut plywood into enough squares to fit your space. Ours are 18 inches square. Wrap the front of each square in quilt batting, stapling to the back. Cut a square of fabric at least 2 inches wider on each side than the plywood square. Stretch the fabric over the batting and staple to the back of the plywood. Trim away excess fabric (especially at the corners) to make hanging easier. To hang, place a sawtooth picture hanger on the back of each panel and arrange on the wall above your bed.
See how-to pictures for this headboard.

    Squared Off

    Break an oversize headboard into small squares for an easy upholstered headboard project. To make this headboard, cut plywood into enough squares to fit your space. Ours are 18 inches square. Wrap the front of each square in quilt batting, stapling to the back. Cut a square of fabric at least 2 inches wider on each side than the plywood square. Stretch the fabric over the batting and staple to the back of the plywood. Trim away excess fabric (especially at the corners) to make hanging easier. To hang, place a sawtooth picture hanger on the back of each panel and arrange on the wall above your bed.

    Reblog
     Plank Headboard
Go beyond the basic headboard and make the entire wall behind your bed a headboard. Distressed barnwood planks run the length of the wall behind this bed. To create the look, measure your wall to determine what length of planks you’ll need and how many it will take to cover the wall from top to bottom. Starting at the ceiling, secure the planks using nails at several points along the board, ensuring some of the nails are driven into studs. Continue down the wall, butting the top of the next board against the bottom of the previous board. You may need to cut a board horizontally when you get to the bottom. Including a regular, upholstered headboard with the bed will add comfort to the wall.

    Plank Headboard

    Go beyond the basic headboard and make the entire wall behind your bed a headboard. Distressed barnwood planks run the length of the wall behind this bed. To create the look, measure your wall to determine what length of planks you’ll need and how many it will take to cover the wall from top to bottom. Starting at the ceiling, secure the planks using nails at several points along the board, ensuring some of the nails are driven into studs. Continue down the wall, butting the top of the next board against the bottom of the previous board. You may need to cut a board horizontally when you get to the bottom. Including a regular, upholstered headboard with the bed will add comfort to the wall.

    Reblog

    Autumn Colors

    (Source: 4inspireddesign.com)

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    The Easiest Pillow Cover Ever
You’ll find the directions here:  http://organizeyourstuffnow.com/wordpress/the-easiest-pillow-cover-ever

    The Easiest Pillow Cover Ever

    You’ll find the directions here:  http://organizeyourstuffnow.com/wordpress/the-easiest-pillow-cover-ever

    Reblog

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    Reds & Oranges: Dramatically Dark
Use a deep color such as chestnut or rusty red for dramatic effect in a powder room or small den. When you have a really small room where there’s no way you’re going to make it look big, make it more of what it is — small and dark — but make it dramatic.

    Reds & Oranges: Dramatically Dark

    Use a deep color such as chestnut or rusty red for dramatic effect in a powder room or small den. When you have a really small room where there’s no way you’re going to make it look big, make it more of what it is — small and dark — but make it dramatic.

    Reblog
    Reds & Oranges: High Intensity
Pair terra-cotta with equally vivid colors for impact: gorgeous golds, a purple so deep it’s almost brown, olive and sage greens, and fiery oranges.

    Reds & Oranges: High Intensity

    Pair terra-cotta with equally vivid colors for impact: gorgeous golds, a purple so deep it’s almost brown, olive and sage greens, and fiery oranges.

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    Reds & Oranges: Pretty in Peach
Gravitate toward hues that are hard to put a name on — peach-pinks or orangey corals. These hybrid colors are always more interesting and give the color more depth and softness.

    Reds & Oranges: Pretty in Peach

    Gravitate toward hues that are hard to put a name on — peach-pinks or orangey corals. These hybrid colors are always more interesting and give the color more depth and softness.

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    Reds & Oranges: Unexpected Elegance
If you’re thinking of painting a room red, consider a peach or melon color instead. Both are saturated colors but they’re more elegant, unexpected, and sophisticated.

    Reds & Oranges: Unexpected Elegance

    If you’re thinking of painting a room red, consider a peach or melon color instead. Both are saturated colors but they’re more elegant, unexpected, and sophisticated.

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    Pink: Cool Down
To put a chill on bright citrus hues, add a splash of turquoise. Or for a sophisticated look, pair a rich grapefruit color with dark chocolate. Pair it with soft yellow for a young, cheery look.

    Pink: Cool Down

    To put a chill on bright citrus hues, add a splash of turquoise. Or for a sophisticated look, pair a rich grapefruit color with dark chocolate. Pair it with soft yellow for a young, cheery look.

    Reblog
    Pink: Purely Pink
Pale pink looks best in a room with abundant natural light. That way the color can glow and step forward and away from the neutrals.

    Pink: Purely Pink

    Pale pink looks best in a room with abundant natural light. That way the color can glow and step forward and away from the neutrals.

    Reblog